Your Respectful Hoarding Cleanup Pro in Sikeston

Call 913-380-0609

Sikeston MO Hoarding House

Professional Hoarding Cleanup

We are professionals and we take our job seriously! “Pros” is in our name for a reason. It constantly reminds us of our commitment to those that we serve. We offer discreet cleanup services. Your health and well-being are at the core of what we do.

Cleaning of Your Home with No Judgement!

Discreet and non-judgemental clean-up of your home is what you deserve and that’s what you will get from our team. You will feel liberated after we complete the declutter process of your home.

Get a Free Quote

Hoarding Cleanup Pros Mission Statement:

To provide help in a professional, empathetic, respectful and discreet manner.

Built to Help!

Brian Burton and Jim Clevenger started Hoarding Cleanup Pros in the Spring of 2019 to help those in need of extreme cleaning services. They noticed an absence of caring and empathetic professionals servicing those in need. They started Hoarding Cleanup Pros in the Spring of 2019 to service those in need of extreme cleaning services.

Sikeston MO Fun Facts

The first explorers and settlers came to a region of cypress swamps and forested prairies. At the beginning of the 20th century, the Little River Drainage District was formed to reclaim the land. This was the world’s largest drainage project, moving more earth than completed during the construction of the Panama Canal.[6]

In 1541, Spanish explorer Hernando de Soto may have stood upon the Sikeston Ridge, although some historical references dispute this, believing that he traveled further south than Sikeston. The area was claimed by the French as part of La Louisiane, and they ceded it in 1763 to the Spanish after being defeated by Britain in the Seven Years’ War. In 1789, by order of the King of Spain, an overland route was laid out to connect the cities of St. Louis and New Orleans. This frontier road was known as the El Camino Real or King’s Highway.

In 1803 the United States acquired this area under the Louisiana Purchase. More Americans began to settle west of the river. From December 16, 1811 to February 4, 1812, the area was struck by the 1811–12 New Madrid earthquakes (a series of more than 2,000 events). They are believed by some to have been the greatest in North American history.

The Hunter Memorial Cemetery, located on the grounds of the local Presbyterian Church, was established around 1812 after the New Madrid earthquake by Joseph Hunter II who served under George Rogers Clark during the Revolutionary War and on the Territorial Council for President Madison. In 1814, the village of Winchester was laid out about one-half a mile south of the future site of Sikeston. It was the seat of justice for New Madrid County, but after the county seat was moved in 1822 to New Madrid, Winchester became defunct and abandoned. The Winchester jail was completed in 1817 and was used until December 1821, when Scott County was organized.[7]

The land for the city of Sikeston was first owned by Frenchman Francis Paquette. In 1829, the city site was acquired by the Stallcup family. In 1859, city founder John Sikes, who had married into the Stallcup family, gained control of the land. In April 1860, he had the city platted in anticipation of the completion of the Cairo and Fulton Railroad, which would intersect with the King’s Highway. In the city of New Madrid, the street was known as Big Prairie Road, and later as Sikeston Road after the city of Sikeston was established.[8]

Today Kingshighway, also known as Business U.S. Highway 61, serves Sikeston as a primary north–south street. It is lined with businesses and older historic homes. Sikeston’s downtown area includes Malone Park, the city’s oldest park, and the historic First Methodist Church columns. These six pillars are all that remain of the 1879 church which was destroyed in 1968 by fire.

The first house in Sikeston is believed to have been located at 318 Baker Lane. The “Baker House” was probably built in 1855, about five years before the town was founded. One of the early inhabitants of this house was Lee Hunter, for whom one of the elementary schools is named. The house once had a large barn, located on the site where Lee Hunter school was later built. The Baker family moved into the house in 1888 and purchased it from the Hunter family in the early 1950s.

Call for a free quote! 913-380-0609

or contact us via email