Your Respectful Hoarding Cleanup Pro in Fort Worth

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Professional Hoarding Cleanup

We are professionals and we take our job seriously! “Pros” is in our name for a reason. It constantly reminds us of our commitment to those that we serve. We offer discreet cleanup services. Your health and well-being are at the core of what we do.

Fort Worth TX Hoarding House

Cleaning of Your Home with No Judgement!

Discreet and non-judgemental clean-up of your home is what you deserve and that’s what you will get from our team. You will feel liberated after we complete the declutter process of your home.

Steps Towards Your Freedom

#1 Call us and we will talk through your situation or complete our “Free Quote” option. We know that seeking help can be the hardest step. That is why the HCP Team is comprised of compassionate, caring people.

#2 Your Case Manager will contact you in the method of your choosing, phone or e-mail (sorry, telegraph and smoke signals are not currently available). Further details will be discussed and a bid will be presented.

#3 We coordinate the best time for you to complete the project.

#4 Sorting and organizing will be complete per your plan. We will handle the disposal and possible donations to your favorite charity.

#5 We will leave your home in broom swept or if you desire a full-service cleaning we can handle that too.

Easy Peasy…Right!? Not true, but we are with you through this process. The reward will be a true home!

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Getting Help

Hoarding is a serious issue. If you want more info for yourself or a loved one, please visit American Pyshciatric Assocition website and refer to our blog post, Do’s and Don’ts of Helping.

Extreme House Cleaning Services

We are Fort Worth‘s experts at getting your home back to order! We have been serving our clients since 2019. Some call us “Specialists,” others call us “Experts” and they all call us “Professionals” of extreme house cleaning.

Fort Worth TX Hoarding Cleanup

The Treaty of Bird’s Fort between the Republic of Texas and several Native American tribes was signed in 1843 at Bird’s Fort in present-day Arlington, Texas.[16][17] Article XI of the treaty provided that no one may “pass the line of trading houses” (at the border of the Indians’ territory) without permission of the President of Texas, and may not reside or remain in the Indians’ territory. These “trading houses” were later established at the junction of the Clear Fork and West Fork of the Trinity River in present-day Fort Worth.[18] At this river junction, the U.S. War Department established Fort Worth in 1849 as the northernmost of a system of 10 forts for protecting the American Frontier following the end of the Mexican–American War. The city of Fort Worth continues to be known as “where the West begins”.

A line of seven army posts was established in 1848–49 after the Mexican War to protect the settlers of Texas along the western American Frontier and included Fort Worth, Fort GrahamFort GatesFort CroghanFort Martin ScottFort Lincoln, and Fort Duncan.[20] Originally, 10 forts had been proposed by Major General William Jenkins Worth (1794–1849), who commanded the Department of Texas in 1849. In January 1849, Worth proposed a line of 10 forts to mark the western Texas frontier from Eagle Pass to the confluence of the West Fork and Clear Fork of the Trinity River. One month later, Worth died from cholera in South Texas.

General William S. Harney assumed command of the Department of Texas and ordered Major Ripley A. Arnold (Company F, Second United States Dragoons) to find a new fort site near the West Fork and Clear Fork. On June 6, 1849, Arnold, advised by Middleton Tate Johnson, established a camp on the bank of the Trinity River and named the post Camp Worth in honor of the late General Worth. In August 1849, Arnold moved the camp to the north-facing bluff, which overlooked the mouth of the Clear Fork of the Trinity River. The United States War Department officially named the post Fort Worth on November 14, 1849.

Native American attacks were still a threat in the area, as this was their traditional territory and they resented encroachment by European-American settlers, but people from the United States set up homesteads near the fort. E. S. Terrell (1812–1905) from Tennessee claimed to be the first resident of Fort Worth. The fort was flooded the first year and moved to the top of the bluff; the current courthouse was built on this site. The fort was abandoned September 17, 1853.  No trace of it remains.

As a stop on the legendary Chisholm Trail, Fort Worth was stimulated by the business of the cattle drives and became a brawling, bustling town. Millions of head of cattle were driven north to market along this trail. Fort Worth became the center of the cattle drives, and later, the ranching industry. It was given the nickname of Cowtown.

During the Civil War, Fort Worth suffered from shortages of money, food, and supplies. The population dropped as low as 175, but began to recover during Reconstruction. By 1872, Jacob Samuels, William Jesse Boaz, and William Henry Davis had opened general stores. The next year, Khleber M. Van Zandt established Tidball, Van Zandt, and Company, which became Fort Worth National Bank in 1884.

In 1875, the Dallas Herald published an article by a former Fort Worth lawyer, Robert E. Cowart, who wrote that the decimation of Fort Worth’s population, caused by the economic disaster and hard winter of 1873, had dealt a severe blow to the cattle industry. Added to the slowdown due to the railroad’s stopping the laying of track 30 miles (48 km) outside of Fort Worth, Cowart said that Fort Worth was so slow that he saw a panther asleep in the street by the courthouse. Although an intended insult, the name Panther City was enthusiastically embraced when in 18

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